Golf TipsThe Golf Slice

What is the Golf Slice?

A Slice is a specific left-to-right trajectory shape for a golf ball created by a significant tilt of the spin-axis of the golf ball to the right, or a clockwise spin. This is opposite for lefties. A slice usually ends up right of the target line, and the term is often used when the curve in the trajectory is extreme and unintentional. The less extreme version of a slice is called a “fade”.

What causes the Golf Slice?

In understanding the basics of the golf swing, in order to hit the ball squarely and straight every time, you must return to the original spot at impact. A Slice is caused by the club face being slightly open at the point of impact, thus causing the ball to spin in a clockwise motion, (opposite for lefties). In most cases the swing path is correct, but the golf ball is not being hit squarely at the point of impact, commonly caused by what is known as a “weak grip”.

How to fix the Golf Slice?

The simplest fix for a slice is in the grip. By having a “weak grip”, a grip that is turned more counter-clockwise, (opposite for lefties), can cause the club face to open at the time of impact. Start by turning your grip slightly to the right, (left for lefties), thus giving you a “stronger grip”, not holding the club more tightly. Remember the basics and only hold the club tight enough to keep control. You should not have any tension on your wrist and forearms. Golf TipsPractice the stronger grip and check your results. Changing your grip should be slight, over compensating can cause other problems with your swing or begin to cause you to Hook. Most Slicing is from a “weak grip”, but you must have the proper basics of a swing to properly correct your Slice.

Whether you are a beginner or have played before, knowing the basics will continue to help you become a better golfer. But knowing is not all, you must practice, practice, practice. What looks good on paper or on the Internet, is only as good as you applying it on the golf course.

The Golf Hook!

What is the Golf Hook?

A Hook is a specific right-to-left trajectory shape for a golf ball created by a significant tilt of the spin-axis of the golf ball to the left, or a counter-clockwise spin. This is opposite for lefties. A Hook usually ends up to the left of the target line, and the term is often used when the curve in the trajectory is extreme and unintentional. The less extreme version of a Hook is called a “Draw”.

What causes the Golf Hook?

In understanding the basics of the golf swing, in order to hit the ball squarely and straight every time, you must return to the original spot at impact. A Hook is caused by the club face being slightly closed at the point of impact, thus causing the ball to spin in a counter-clockwise motion, (opposite for lefties). In most cases the swing path is correct, but the golf ball is not being hit squarely at the point of impact, commonly caused by what is known as a “strong grip”.

How to fix the Golf Hook?

As in the Slice, the Hook is often a product of an improper grip. Start by looking at your current grip. Remembering the Basics of the Golf Grip, you should only see 2 knuckles of your left hand. If you see 3 knuckles, then you have a “strong grip” and this maybe the cause of your Golf Hook. You can fix your Hook by trying to change you grip to a “weak grip”. Turn your hands slightly counter-clockwise on your grip, (opposite for lefties), thus weakening the Grip. Grip pressure is also a key element in the release process. If the pressure is too loose at impact then the tendency will for the club to release too early causing the ball to Hook. Remember the basics and only hold the club tight enough to keep control. You should not have any tension on your wrist and forearms. Golf TipsPractice the grip and check your results. Changing your grip should be slight, over compensating can cause other problems with your swing or begin to cause you to Slice. Most Golf Hooks are from a “strong grip”, but in order for you to correct your Hook properly, you must have the know and learn the the Basics of the Golf Swing.

Whether you are a beginner or have played before, knowing the basics will continue to help you become a better golfer. But knowing is not all, you must practice, practice, practice. What looks good on paper or on the Internet, is only as good as you applying it on the golf course.

Simple Tips About Golf

 

There are four basic golf routines that will give you the consistency needed to hit a great shot every time..

The Grip: A good golf swing starts with the grip. Your grip should be balanced with both hands having equal control and pressure on the club. You do not want to have one hand having more control, thus causing a slice, or hook. Make sure that the pressure on your grip is slight, like holding a tomato without squeezing out the juices, just enough to hold on and control the club.高尔夫, 球, 高尔夫球场球, 高尔夫俱乐部, 草, 运动, 游戏, 绿色

Start with having the club sitting diagonally across the fingers of your left hand. Let your hand close naturally around the club forming a “V”down the shaft with your thumb and index finger. That “V” should line up directly from the left shoulder down the shaft of the club, lining up with the logo on the grip, and follow down the face of the club.

The right hand is brought in and the same procedure done, only opposite. Some grips allow the index finger of the left hand to inter lock with the pinky of the right hand, to help give better control of the grip and marry the hands together. When you are done, the grip should feel natural and you should be looking for these things; the “V”, made by both hands should be pointing straight down the shaft of the club, as you look down at your left hand, you should see 2 knuckles, and your grip should only be as hard as to control the club.

This grip will help you to return the club face squarely to the ball at impact every time. Having the right golf grip eliminates having to compensate your golf swing.

  • The Stance: Your stance will change with every shot taken during your game. Having the fundamentals to a great stance will help you have great shots everytime.

The fundamentals of a great stance are:

  • Placing your feet about shoulder width apart with your toes turned slightly outwards for more balance through the swing.
  • Bend your knees for a more relaxed, stable stance.
  • Do not reach or crowd yourself for the ball. The club face should be positioned center of the ball and the butt end of the club should be about 4-5 inches from the inside of the left thigh and in line with it.
  • Head down and looking at the ball, maybe even looking behind the ball, at all times.
  • With short irons, the golf ball should be positioned in line with the middle of your feet.
  • With long irons and a 5-wood, move so that the golf ball is positioned just in front of the center of your feet.
  • With drivers or a 3-wood, move so that the golf ball is positioned just inside of your front foot.
  • Setting Alignment: Quite often golfers will miss there intended targets, not by bad swings or incorrect golf grips, they just aim wrong. Alignment to the target is a simple procedure to master and you can be hitting more accurately in a few short steps.

The best way to set up your alignment, is to imagine two parallel lines, like a railroad track. The “outer track” is a line from the ball to the target. The “inside track” is the line on which your feet, hips and shoulders should be aligned.

On the driving range, set up this simple demonstration. You can use two yard sticks or even two golf clubs. Set up your stance as normal, before hitting the ball, place one yard stick about two inches beyond the ball aligned with the target, place the second yard stick at your feet, making sure that both yard sticks are parallel, thus creating the railroad track. This will help you to position your feet and align you to the target.

Practicing at the driving range with this method will help train your muscles to recognize a “square” alignment and help you on the golf course later. On the golf course it is just a matter of imagining the railroad tracks to align your shot, before you swing.

  • The Swing: Is very difficult to put into words or describe. The swing is broken down into three distinctive parts, the Back Swing, the Down Swing and the Follow Through.

Here is a brief description of each to help you better understand the actions, but you will need to, if you are a beginner, get lessons, and if you are just trying to better your game, practice with knowledge you were given.

  • The Back Swing: The Back Swing, or the Take-Away is primarily derived from the shoulders. As the shoulders turn to the right, (left for lefties) the natural take-away of the hands and arms follow along, making sure to maintain a stiff left arm, not to break at the elbow. Your right elbow should begin to break and the club shaft be parallel to your foot line. At about the half way point in the Back Swing, the club shaft should be parallel to the ground and target line. As you continue through the Back Swing your right elbow should reach 90 degrees as the swing hits its highest point. The entire Back Swing should offer no resistance and is primarily in the shoulders. You should maintain a stable stance with both feet on the ground, your weight shifted to your right foot, and your hips aligned with your feet. Be careful not to push the club away or pull the club in, watch that the club shaft be parallel to your foot line and let your arms push away normally. Keep your head down, if the Back Swing is in proper order, your chin will be resting on your left shoulder.

 

 

  • The Down Swing: To begin the Down Swing, a milli-second before you reach the highest point of the Back Swing, your weight should begin to shift back to your left foot. Be careful, when your weight is shifting from your right foot that the transfer is not a swaying motion, but a fluid transfer, being careful not to move your head off the ball. The action of the Down Swing will follow the same path and action as the Back Swing, except in reverse. When you reach the point in the down swing when you commence the whipping action of the club head, you must resist the natural urge to rush the shot. Slow down the rotation of the shoulders and allow the momentum of your arms to accelerate the club head into the contact area. As you approach the impact area, your arms and hips should return to the original position as they were when you addressed the ball. This is critical in the Down Swing, if your hips lead your arms during impact you will have a tendency to Slice or Draw your shot. If your arms lead your hips at the point of impact, you will have a tendency to Hook your shots. You should be careful at this pont to keep your head down and your eye on the ball. Any other movement will cause variations in your shot.

The Follow Through: As you follow through the the impact area, your arms should now pull you through the the Follow Through. You will now complete the arc created through the Down Swing. The Follow Through again is a natural process, starting with the shoulders and ending with the hips pointing at the target. As the club hits the impact area, the weight transfer continues

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moving completely to the left foot. The hips continue their pivot motion, naturally pulling the back of the right foot off the ground. When the Follow Through is done correctly, you should end up with your shoulders, hips and right knee pointing to the target. At the end of the Back Swing, your chin is touching your left shoulder, at the end of the Follow Through, your chin is now touching your right shoulder.

The Basic Golf Swing is not difficult to master or understand. If the Golf Swing is learned and done correctly, your shots will go where you intend them everytime. The one problem with the Golf Swing, is the Golfer. Remember these basic rules for a perfect Golf Swing:

  • Starts with the right grip.
  • Must have a stable and proper stance.
  • Must be aligned to the target.
  • Keep your feet firmly planted.
  • Keep your left arm straight through your Back and Down Swing.
  • Push in your Back Swing and pull through your Down Swing and Follow Through.
  • Don’t try to “Kill” the ball. Have a strong and fluid swing.
  • Head down and keep your eye on the ball. Let your partners watch where the ball goes.
  • Practice, Practice, Practice

Whether you are a beginner or have played before, knowing the basics will continue to help you become a better golfer. But knowing is not all, you must practice, practice, practice. What looks good on paper or on the Internet, is only as good as you applying it on the golf course.

 

Simple Rules of Golf

Golf is a simple game in concept, strike a ball with a club from a prepared area, known as the “teeing ground”, across a fairway and rough to a another prepared area, known as the “putting green”, which has a hole in it, and put the ball into the hole. The object of the game is to complete a “round of golf”, consisting of 18 holes, by hitting a ball from the teeing ground into the hole on the putting green in the fewest possible number of strokes.

There are two basic forms of play, match play and stroke play. In match play the winner is determined by the number of holes won and lost in the game. In stroke play, the winner is determined by the total number of strokes taken to complete the round.

There are three simple rules to remember when playing golf:高尔夫, 高尔夫球, 行使, 草哥尔夫球, 体育, 球, 高尔夫俱乐部 Play the course as you find it.
Play the Ball as it lies.
Do what’s right and fair.

DEFINITIONS

The Rules of Golf contains over forty Definitions which form the foundation around which the Rules of play are written. A good understanding of the defined terms will help in the correct application of the Rules.

  • Teeing Ground – the starting place for the hole, defined by two tee-markers.
  • Through the Green – the whole area of the golf course except the teeing ground and putting green of the hole being played and all hazards.
  • Hazards – any bunker or water hazard.
  • Putting Green – an area specially prepared for putting and containing a 4 1/2 inch diameter hole.
  • Out of Bounds – ground on which play is prohibited.
  • Loose Impediments – natural objects such as stones, leaves and twigs provided they are not fixed or growing, are not solidly embedded and are not sticking to the ball.
  • Obstructions – any man-made object in the area “Through the Green”.
  • Casual Water – any temporary accumulation of water on the course which is visible before or after the player takes his stance (dew and frost are not casual water).
  • Ground Under Repair – any portion of the course so marked by the Committee. Also includes material piled for removal and a hole made by a greenskeeper, even if not so marked.

THE RULES OF PLAY

Before Beginning your round:

  • Read your score care and check for local rules.
  • Check golf balls with other members of your group. Make sure you are not playing the same identified golf balls.
  • Check your golf clubs. You are only allowed a maximum of 14 clubs, and make sure you have what you need for the round.

TEEING OFF

Tee off between the tee-markers. You may not tee off in front of the markers, but you are allowed to tee off up to two club-lengths behind the front line of the tee-markers.

 

PLAYING THE BALL

Play the ball where it lies, except in ground under repair or if there is an man made obstruction in the through the green.

If your ball lies in a bunker or a water hazard, you are not allowed to ground your club before your down swing.

Playing the wrong golf ball will constitute a 2 stroke penalty.

 

PUTTING GREEN

You are allowed to mark, lift and clean your ball on the putting green. You must replace your ball to the exact spot.

You should repair your ball marks on the green.

 

If the flag stick is left in the hole, and you are putting on the green surface, and the ball strikes the pin, you are assessed a 2 stroke penalty.

 

BALL AT REST

If your ball is at rest and it is moved by you, your partner or your caddie, except as permitted by the Rules, or if it moves after you have addressed it, add a penalty stroke and replace your ball.

If your ball is at rest and is moved by someone else or another ball, replace it without penalty to you.

BALL IN MOTION DEFLECTED OR STOPPED

Ball struck by you is deflected or stopped by you, your partner or your caddie – in match play you lose the hole; in stroke play you incur a two-stroke penalty and the ball is played as it lies.高尔夫球手, 高尔夫, 运动, 当然, 娱乐

Ball struck by you is deflected or stopped by someone else – play your ball as it lies without penalty, except (a) in match play, if an opponent or his caddie deflects the ball you have an option to replay the stroke or (b) in stroke play, if the ball is deflected after a stroke from on the putting green, you must replay it.

Ball struck by you is deflected or stopped by another ball at rest- in match play, no penalty and the ball is played as it lies except. In stroke play you incur a two-stroke penalty if your ball and the other ball were on the putting green before you played.

 

LIFTING, DROPPING AND PLACING THE BALL

If a lifted ball is to be replaced, its position must be marked. If a ball is to be dropped or placed in any other position (e.g. taking relief from GUR, etc.) it is recommended that the ball’s original position be marked.

When dropping, stand erect, hold the ball at shoulder height and arm’s length and drop it. If a dropped ball strikes you or your partner, caddie or equipment it must be re-dropped without penalty.

There are eight instances where a dropped ball rolls to such a position that it must be re-dropped – see Rules of Golf Rule 20 – 2c

LOOSE IMPEDIMENTS

You may move a loose impediment, unless it and your ball are in a hazard. However, if you have touched a loose impediment within one club-length of your ball and your ball moves, the ball must be replaced and (unless your ball was on the putting green) you incur a penalty stroke.

 

OBSTRUCTIONS

Check the Local Rules on the score card for guidance on immovable obstructions (e.g. surfaced roads and cart paths etc.).

Movable obstructions (e.g. rakes, hoses, equipment etc.) anywhere on the course may be moved. If the ball moves it must be replaced without penalty.

If an immovable obstruction (e.g. sprinkler, fence) interferes with your stance or swing, you may drop the ball within one club-length of the nearest point of relief not nearer the hole.

 

CASUAL WATER, GROUND UNDER REPAIR

If your ball is in casual water, ground under repair or a hole made by a burrowing animal, you may drop without penalty within one club-length of the nearest point of relief, not nearer the hole.

 

WATER HAZARDS

Check the Local Rules on the score card to establish whether a sea, lake, river etc. is a `water hazard’ or a `lateral water hazard’.

Ball in water hazard – play the ball as it lies or, under penalty of one stroke, (a) drop any distance behind the water hazard keeping a straight line between the hole, the point where the ball crossed the margin of the water hazard and spot on which the ball is dropped, or (b) play again from where you hit the ball into the hazard.

Ball in lateral water hazard – in addition to the options for a ball in a water hazard (see above), under penalty of one stroke, you may drop within two club-lengths of (a) the point where the ball crossed the margin of the hazard or (b) a point on the opposite side of the hazard equidistant from the hole.

 

OUT OF BOUNDS OR LOST BALL

Check the Local Rules on the score card to identify the boundaries of the course. If your ball is lost outside a water hazard or out of bounds you must play another ball from the spot where the last shot was played under penalty of one stroke, i.e. stroke and distance. 球, 高尔夫, 高尔夫球场球, 高尔夫球场, 草, 绿色, 孔, 修剪, 娱乐You are allowed 5 minutes to search for a ball, after which if it is not found or identified it is lost. If, after playing a shot, you think your ball may be lost outside a water hazard or out of bounds you may play a `provisional ball’. You must state that it is a provisional ball and play it before you go forward to search for the original ball. If the original ball is lost or out of bounds you must continue with the provisional ball under penalty of one stroke. If the original ball is not lost or out of bounds, you must continue play of the hole with it and the provisional ball must be abandoned.

 

UNPLAYABLE BALL

If you believe your ball is unplayable outside a water hazard, you may under penalty of one stroke, (a) drop within two club-lengths of where the ball lies, not nearer the hole, (b) drop any distance behind the point where the ball lay, keeping a straight line between the hole, the point where the ball lay and the spot on which the ball is dropped, or (c) replay the shot. If your ball is in a bunker you may proceed under (a), (b) and (c). However, if you elect to proceed under (a) or (b) you must drop in the bunker.

 

Etiquette

Etiquette is how you play the game after you have mastered the rules. It is the hidden rules that make golf what it is today. Following these simple etiquette rules makes golf fun for everyone:

  • Never talk, move or stand to close to a play who is making a stroke.
  • Make sure the group in front of you is out of the way before continuing play.
  • Keep up a steady pace, as not to slow play.
  • Let faster groups play through.
  • Spend only 5 minutes looking for a lost ball.
  • Leave the green after holing out. Count score on next hole.
  • Replace all divots and repair ball marks on the green.
  • Rack sand traps after use.
  • Do not step on another players line of putt.
  • Do not drop clubs on the putting green.
  • Follow all rules of the club house.

Following the rules and having good etiquette will make golf a much more enjoyable outing. If everyone follows the rules and etiquette on the golf course, more golfers would join the game. Golf is an individual sport, played in an arena of many players. Remember, you are not the only one on the course. Enjoy and have fun.